Awesome Authors’ Book Reviews Week 5

Today’s featured Awesome Authors’ book reviews and illustrations are from Cora Kirby-Gable, age 8 and Fiona Hendrickson, age 6.  These appeared in the Grand Forks Herald on Sunday, August 17.

Book reviews from the Awesome Authors will be published every Sunday in the Herald for the next 3 weeks.

Tips to prepare for school – Part 3

Here is Part 3.  School will be starting soon. Here are some quick tips to help parents and kids get ready for the upcoming school year from McClatchy-Tribune.

Setting the family alarm clock to hit those early, early — did we mention early? — morning classes is only part of the challenge of going back to school.

OK, first, you have to pick out that crucial first day outfit. Not too fussy. Not too plain.

After that, there are lots of questions for kids and parents. What do you need to know about school? What are some healthful snacks and lunches? What questions should parents ask their kids about their day? How do parents help establish good study habits?

Today we will look at health and nutrition, super snacks, a good night’s sleep, staying  in shape and lunches.

 

Awesome Authors Week 4

Today’s featured Awesome Authors’ book reviews and illustrations are from Grace Carriere and Eleece Reilly.  These appeared in the Grand Forks Herald on Sunday, August 10.

Book reviews from the Awesome Authors will be published every Sunday in the Herald for the next 4 weeks.

Tips to prepare for school – Part 2

School will be starting soon. Here are some quick tips to help parents and kids get ready for the upcoming school year from McClatchy-Tribune.

Setting the family alarm clock to hit those early, early — did we mention early? — morning classes is only part of the challenge of going back to school.

OK, first, you have to pick out that crucial first day outfit. Not too fussy. Not too plain.

After that, there are lots of questions for kids and parents. What do you need to know about school? What are some healthful snacks and lunches? What questions should parents ask their kids about their day? How do parents help establish good study habits?

Today we will look at tips for getting involved, people you should know at your child’s school and dealing with bullies.

COMING SOON … health and nutrition, super snacks, a good night’s sleep, stay in shape and lunches.

Tips to prepare for school – Part 1

School will be starting soon.  Here are some quick tips to help parents and kids get ready for the upcoming school year from McClatchy-Tribune.

Setting the family alarm clock to hit those early, early — did we mention early? — morning classes is only part of the challenge of going back to school.

OK, first, you have to pick out that crucial first day outfit. Not too fussy. Not too plain.

After that, there are lots of questions for kids and parents. What do you need to know about school? What are some healthful snacks and lunches? What questions should parents ask their kids about their day? How do parents help establish good study habits?

Today we will look at first day jitters, preparing to study, connecting with your kid and helping with homework:

COMING SOON … tips for getting involved, people you should know at your child’s school and dealing with bullies.

Linda Niemi and Lisa Deffendall, of McClatchy Newspapers, and Jody Mitori, of McClatchy-Tribune, contributed to this report.

Attention Grand Forks Parents

In today’s Grand Forks Herald (8/8/14), you’ll find a special section called “Spotlight on Excellence” produced by the Grand Forks Public Schools.  It is a great resource for if you have a student attending Grand Forks Public Schools. It lists all of the Grand Forks Public Schools, their addresses, phone numbers and the names of the principals.  You’ll also find school registration dates and times,open house dates,  GFPS 2014-2015  calendar, plus a lot more useful information.

Getting Preschoolers Ready to Read

Here’s an interesting article written by Kim Jacobs, National Center for Families Learning Project Manager. The article is from a literacy tab produced by the Newspaper Association of America and sponsored by VerizonReads.com.  The article focuses on getting preschoolers ready to read.

 

GETTING PRESCHOOLERS READY TO READ

By Kim Jacobs, NCFL Project Manager

Rhymes? Rhythm? Repetition? That’s kid stuff, isn’t it? A way to keep children occupied and have a little fun, right? In fact, rhymes, rhythm and repetition are important for helping preschool children get ready to read, much like reading aloud does.

Parents and other adults play an important role in supporting young children’s emerging literacy. We know that preschool children need many kinds of experiences with print to help them become good readers. Preschoolers love to have fun with language, and this can be done through play and in everyday routines—like reading the newspaper!
Talking and listening are important skills for all of us. When children listen, they take in sounds and words and learn to understand conversation and speech. So what can parents do to help children build their oral language skills? They can talk—and talk a lot! According to researcher Todd Risley, the average young child should hear 1,250 words or more per hour in every day interactions at home.

That’s a lot of words, but newspapers can help you discover and explore them. Find an interesting article with a photograph in your paper. Read part of the story aloud to your family and show the picture to your preschooler. Ask her what she thinks the picture is about. Respond to what she says and ask more questions to extend your conversation. Talk about how pictures can tell a story just like words you read or say.

SOUNDS, SOUNDS, SOUNDS  - Our lives are full of sounds—speech, songs and the world around us. Help your preschooler pay attention to sounds. Point out things in the newspaper that make sounds or identify the beginning or ending sounds of words. Make connections to things your child understands. “Look Marta, here’s a picture of Manny, the monkey at the zoo! His name starts out like yours. They both start with the letter ‘M.’ Let’s make some rhymes: Manny, Fanny, Danny. Can you say one?”
Bring out the rhyming books and dust off the record player—everything from Mother Goose to Dr. Seuss can help children play with sounds. Once children can hear, identify and play with sounds, they move on to sounding out words.

HOW DO WE USE THE NEWSPAPER?  When children are read to often, they begin to understand how books, magazines and other forms of print work. How does the newspaper work? Watch how your child turns the pages, looks at the print, and notices different features of the text. Ask him/her some questions about the newspaper as you look at it together.

“Am I holding the paper right-side-up or upside down? Should I start at the front and go to the back? How do I follow the words on the page? Yes, from the left to the right.What are these symbols? They are letters. Do the letters make words? Are the pictures important to the story?”

These are concepts of print that children begin to understand when they interact with print. They are essential for helping children get ready to read. As preschoolers get ready to read, it’s important for them to understand that letters are symbols and that words are made up of these symbols. Older preschool children often recognize that these symbols represent sounds. Preschoolers need lots of opportunities to see, handle and use letters in their play.

THE POWER OF A NAME - What’s the most important word to a child? His/Her name! Preschoolers are proud when they can string together the letters in their names. Look through the newspaper headlines with your child and cut out the letters of her name.

Glue them on paper or just move them around on the tabletop to put them in the correct order. Make a game of it. It’s a big deal for young children to see their name in print.

Helping preschoolers get ready to read is kid stuff – and adult stuff, too. It’s up to adults to provide the everyday experiences—talking and listening, songs and plays, exposure to letters and words and books—that help children get ready. Your daily newspaper can be a wonderful tool along the way.

Tips for choosing and using school backpacks

Here are some tips for choosing and using school backpacks from KidsHealth.org.

1. Look for a backpack with two padded straps that go over your shoulders. The wider the straps, the better.

2. Backpacks with multiple compartments can also help distribute the weight more evenly.

3. Use your locker. Try not to load up on the books for a full day’s classes. Make frequent locker trips to drop off heavy books or extra stuff. An added benefit is that you’ll get more exercise going back and forth to your locker.

4. Figure out the nonessentials, too. If you don’t need an item until the afternoon, why carry it around all morning?

5. Plan your homework. Plan ahead and spread your home-work out over the course of the week so you won’t have to tote all your books home on the weekend.

6. Limit your backpack load. Doctors and physical therapists recommend that people carry no more than 10% to 15% of their body weight in their packs. This means that if you weigh 120 pounds, your backpack should weigh no more than 12-18 pounds.

7. Choosing a lightweight backpack can get you off to a good start. Use your bathroom scale to weigh your backpack and get an idea of what the proper weight for you feels like.

8. Pick it up properly. As with any heavy weight, you should bend at the knees when lifting a backpack to your shoulders.

9. Strengthen your core. A great way to prevent back injury is to strengthen the stabilizing muscles of your torso, including your lower back and abdominal muscles. Weight training, pilates, and yoga are all activities that can be effective in strengthening these core muscles.

So what’s the best way to carry a backpack? Learn from the hiking pros and wear both straps over your shoulders it’s the best way to avoid back pain and other symptoms. Keep your load light enough so that you can easily walk or stand upright, and pack your backpack with the heaviest items closest to your back

Information provided by KidsHealth.org from the health experts of Nemours. © The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth

The Five W’s

Have you ever heard of the Five W’s: Who? What? When? Where? and Why? When it comes to the news, these are five important questions that are asked — and answered — so you and other readers can truly know what’s going on.

To download this sheet, click here

Information is from KRP’s NIE Guide, I Know I Read it in the Newspaper.